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The good the bad and the ugly.
#1
So the good news.

The centre leg is back and I have plastic welded and printed it with a 100% infill. 
Just for insurance I printed a second centre panel and glue and welded in on the first to make it twice as thick.

I think even I could stand on it is that's strong.
here it is installed and welded with my new 3d print pen (best $30 bucks ever)
[Image: attachment.php?aid=874]
[Image: attachment.php?aid=875]


The bad.

I have removed the damaged vents and surrounding which came out whithout any further damage to the body and will weld them up and sand and paint again.
[Image: attachment.php?aid=877]

Now the Ugly :<

While I was installing the centre leg I noticed where the main force of the impact was, It was the skirt!!

It badly cracked and damaged. I will do more investigation but either I replace the entire skirt which is a big job or patch it.

I think I will try patch and paint and see how that looks. Remember this is a static model so it shouldn't be moving around.

Damage below.

[Image: attachment.php?aid=876]


Attached Files
.jpg   IMG_1419.jpg (Size: 67.57 KB / Downloads: 125)
.jpg   IMG_1420.jpg (Size: 49.97 KB / Downloads: 123)
.jpg   IMG_1421.jpg (Size: 37.16 KB / Downloads: 124)
.jpg   IMG_1426.jpg (Size: 74 KB / Downloads: 124)
Having fun in 3d
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#2
My skirt is glued on - this would really screw me! Was there a reason for printing two center pieces, instead of just scaling in the Z?
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#3
(07-31-2018, 05:19 AM)LarryJ Wrote: My skirt is glued on - this would really screw me! Was there a reason for printing two center pieces, instead of just scaling in the Z?

After testing the single one and of course it was already welded, I felt it could be stronger.

Also I think using new PLA I have never used before I don't think it was not printed hot enough so I did it again at 15 degrees hotter and I think the layer adhesive was much better.

Any way it all worked in the end, now I have to start on the next repair.
Having fun in 3d
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#4
Which PLA was it, and what temp did you use?
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#5
(08-02-2018, 02:19 AM)Laserman Wrote: Which PLA was it, and what temp did you use?

3d fillies and  it was 195 and I bumped it up to 215.

I have a hot end which usually runs a lower temp than a PTFE tube.
Having fun in 3d
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#6
I have been running 3dfillies at 210 instead of 200 I used to use. Seems to help a little in terms of consistency. I did recently switch to an all metal hot end, not sure if that corresponds with when I put the temp up.
1
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#7
I have been printing at 220.
I found the higher the temp the better the layer adhesion, 
the down to printing at a higher temp, is it can suffer from more stringing and then filament drip out of the nozzle when it pauses.
But running the higher temp also allows for a slightly higher print speed.

The biggest issue i have at the moment is trying to get the print of the bed.
I have torn the buildtak surface a couple of times now.
Now onto the 4th buildtak surface in as many weeks  Sad
Playing with electricity can be a shocking experience.  Wink
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#8

.jpg   fillie - 2.jpg (Size: 63.85 KB / Downloads: 26)
.jpg   fillie - 1.jpg (Size: 77.51 KB / Downloads: 29)

[Image: attachment.php?aid=927][Image: attachment.php?aid=928]

Take a look at the difference between the crapola filament I got from Hobbyking vs filament from Aurora.
Yhe Hobbyking filament just crumbles, if you run your finger over it, and it is so brittle it can snap trying to load it.

The only problem with the Aurora PLA is that it can suffer from warping, but it is insanely strong.
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